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5 Reasons You Should Eat More Oats

5 Reasons You Should Eat More Oats


The nutritious grain is more beneficial than you think

What do you think of when you think of oats?

Do you think of that old man with long white hair from Quaker Oats smiling back at you as you enjoy your morning oatmeal? Do you think about them sprinkled in a cinnamon-flavored cookie with raisins? Stuck onto the crusts of your favorite whole-grain bread?

Click Here to See 5 Recipes Using Oats

Whether you think about them in the context of food or not, oats, scientifically known as Avena sativa, can be nutritious supplements to your diet because of their many health benefits. Considered a secondary crop, oats are a cereal grain grown for their seeds and are unique because they retain most of their nutrients despite being hulled.

So, sure, you know they’re a grain so they must be good for you, but do you know why?

Among their many nutritional components, oats contain soluble fibers made up of beta glucans, complex carbohydrates that play a major role in the digestive process of oats. Thinking about beta glucans and digestion is easy: think slow. When beta glucans break down, they create a gel-like material that decelerates the process of digestion. While slow digestion may seem like a negative thing, in the case of oats it leads to several positive paybacks and makes them an attractive choice for a healthy diet. So in case the word "grain" isn’t enough for you when deciding whether to eat oats or not, here are five reasons why you should incorporate them into your daily diet:

  1. Cholesterol. One of beta glucans' many effects is the slowing down of fatty acids entering the blood stream, therefore reducing the risk of high "bad" cholesterol.
  2. Immune system. Beta glucans also support the development of white blood cells in your bloodstream, which help your immune system fight bacteria and viruses.
  3. Weight Loss. What better way to keep your diet in check then by lessening your hunger? Because the beta glucans' gel-like component slows down the digestion, eating oats makes you feel fuller, longer.
  4. Blood Sugars. As well as keeping your hunger at bay, the slow digestion of oats results in a slow rise of blood sugars, therefore leading to a controlled level of blood sugars over time.
  5. Energy. Last but not least, the lingering carbohydrates of oats are also in the form of calories, leaving you with a large amount of energy to use throughout the day.

Anne Dolce is the Cook Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @anniecdolce


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.


The #1 Food You Should Eat for Breakfast

Find out what food to add to your morning routine to power you through the day.

Oatmeal is as close to perfect as you can get for a breakfast food. It&aposs a whole food with one ingredient-oats. A hearty bowl gives you energy to power through your morning, fills you up with complex "good" carbohydrates, can be prepped the night before (lifesaving for busy mornings), takes on a variety of toppings and flavors, and is pretty darn cheap. Not to mention, oatmeal fits into a variety of diets and eating patterns, whether you&aposre vegan, gluten-free, trying to lose weight or eating to manage diabetes or heart disease. What more could you want from a breakfast food? Read on to find out even more reasons why oatmeal is No. 1 in our book.

Oatmeal Is Quick

Mornings are busy, so for a breakfast food to be the best, it needs to be fast. Cook up a pot of oats and portion them out for a few different mornings. Or use quick-cooking oats for breakfast in less than 5 minutes. Save even more time in the morning by making overnight oats in mason jars to grab and go on your way out the door. Totally in a bind? Buy plain instant oatmeal or look for flavored varieties (with no more than 9 grams of sugar per serving) to stash in your kitchen cabinet or desk drawer.

Oatmeal Is High in Fiber

There are 4 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup of dry oats. Fiber helps reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, helps you feel full for longer, can help you lose weight and maintain your weight, keeps your gut healthy and helps you poop. Despite all these benefits, most of us aren&apost getting enough fiber. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber a day men need at least 38 grams. Add fruit and nuts to your oatmeal for even more of a fiber boost in the morning.

Oatmeal Is a Good Carb

Oatmeal is a whole-grain powerhouse. The fiber makes you feel fuller longer, so if you tend to find yourself constantly snacking through the morning or reaching for "second breakfast" right when you finish your first, you&aposll likely find that oats keep you better satisfied. No need to fear carbs at breakfast. Complex carbohydrates, like oats, take longer for your body to digest. They don&apost cause the same swings in blood sugars as simple carbs like white bread or sugar. Plus, oats deliver nutrients like magnesium and phosphorus.

Oatmeal Can Help You Lose Weight

Starting your day with a hearty and healthy breakfast sets your tone for the day. Because the fiber in oats keeps you full, you&aposre less likely to eat more in the morning. Regular breakfast eaters tend to be leaner and more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when they eat breakfast. Just watch out for sugary flavored varieties, and consider pairing your oatmeal with some protein. Topping oatmeal with protein like nuts, nut butter, a dollop of ricotta or Greek yogurt or even an egg on top will also help you stay satisfied for longer.